“For Us Cubans, Africa is Our Heart, Our Blood”

“Para Nosotros Los Cubanos, África Es Nuestro Corazón, Nuestra Sangre”

Struggle can make us beautiful, which is why the Cuban Revolution will always inspire. It is as if we begin to see the very backbone of ourselves, the spirit that makes us stand.~aw
Victor Dreke
 
Shared article By Víctor Dreke, Salim Lamrani  |  June 4, 2024
Source: Originally published by Z. Feel free to share widely.

Cuba For Us Cubans, Africa is Our Heart, Our BloodImage by Tumpatumcla~commonswiki, Creative Commons 4.0

Born into a modest family in Sagua la Grande in 1937, Víctor Dreke experienced first-hand the realities of pre-revolutionary Cuba, marked by poverty, racism and discrimination of all kinds. He frequented working-class circles, particularly the sugar industry, which was very present in his native region, and identified with their demands for social justice. At the same time, he became his school’s student representative, voicing the concerns of his generation.

On March 10, 1952, he had just turned fifteen when General Fulgencio Batista orchestrated a coup d’état that shattered the constitutional order and installed a military dictatorship that would last six long years. He discovered the figure of Fidel Castro following the attack on the Moncada barracks in Santiago de Cuba on July 26, 1953, and immediately identified with his cause, defended in his plea/recquisitory known as “History will acquit me”.

With the outbreak of the armed struggle in the Sierra Maestra on December 2, 1956, following the landing of revolutionaries on the island, Víctor Dreke also went underground in the central region of the country. There he met Che Guevara and took part in the final battle at Santa Clara in December 1958.

With the advent of the Cuban Revolution on January 1, 1959, Víctor Dreke was appointed prosecutor of the Revolutionary Tribunals charged with judging the blood crimes committed by the former regime. He also took part in the fight against armed counter-revolutionary groups in the Sierra del Escambray, and confronted the U.S.-organized invasion of the Bay of Pigs.

In 1965, he was asked by senior government officials to organize a group of volunteer fighters to help the guerrillas in the Congo, in the company of Che Guevara. He also led various internationalist missions to Guinea Bissau and Cape Verde at the request of Amilcar Cabral, who was then waging a war of national liberation against Portuguese colonialism. Today, as President of the Cuba-Africa Friendship Association, Víctor Dreke looks back on his history and discusses the links between the Caribbean island and the cradle of humanity.


Salim Lamrani: What memories do you have of your childhood and youth?

Víctor Dreke: I was born on March 10, 1937 in a town called Sagua la Grande in the former province of Las Villas, now called Villa Clara. It was a prosperous area at the time. I’m the youngest of a blended family.

My family was called Castillo Dreke, which was my father’s name. My mother Catalina Mora came from a village called Sierra Morena, near Sagua la Grande. I could have been named Castillo, as one of my brothers was, but my father chose to give me the name Dreke.

I must say that I was a lucky child in the midst of the misery that afflicted the country at the time. My mother Catalina, who gave birth to me, and my adoptive mother Felicia, who raised me, took great care of me. My family was poor, and we lived in a small house with a guano roof on Calle Agramonte no. 30 in Sagua la Grande. I wasn’t a bad kid and I must say I was well educated. I also remember that when I visited my friends at lunchtime and was asked if I’d eaten, I was taught to always answer the same thing – that I’d already eaten and wasn’t hungry, even if it wasn’t true. That was our upbringing.

Like all children my age, I made a few mistakes, but I wasn’t naughty. My full name is Victor Emilio and my childhood friends called me “Emilito”. If I compare myself with today’s kids, I was a kid without much education. I went to a private school that had to be paid for, run by nuns, and I remember that we had to pray on Fridays. However, for family reasons, I wasn’t baptized until I was an adult. I wasn’t a bad student, but I wasn’t brilliant.

SL: Do you remember Fulgencio Batista’s coup d’état on March 10, 1952?

VD: I remember it perfectly, because it was my birthday, my 15th. With a group of young people, we went out into the streets to demonstrate against the coup. We were arrested by the police, who took us to the station before releasing us. I can say that my commitment as an aspiring revolutionary began at that precise date.

My father would go out of his way to explain to me the situation the country was in. He was sympathetic to the Authentic Party of Ramón Grau San Martín and Carlos Prío Socarrás, without being very political. He had previously been linked to the Liberal Party. He was a fish salesman and thought that all politicians were the same, prolix when it came to making electoral promises, but far less inspired when it came to adopting measures for the common good. My older brother Mario was a militant of Eduardo Chibás’ Orthodox Party.

As for me, I didn’t belong to any party. I wasn’t a Marxist. In fact, at the time, I’d heard nothing but negative things about communism. I took part in workers’ strikes in the sugar industry. There were a lot of sugar factories in the province. I was also a student representative at the José Marti Boys’ High School in Sagua la Grande. So, I became politicized in this way, militating with workers and students. I was resolutely opposed to the dictatorship, which murdered opponents and plunged the people into untold misery. I remember the police telling us that black people couldn’t be revolutionaries. I used to tremble with indignation.

SL: How did racism manifest itself in Cuba under Batista’s military regime?

VR: We were discriminated against because of our skin color. We had fewer rights. The same applied to women in relation to men: they suffered the oppression of a patriarchal society.

I became a revolutionary for three fundamental reasons. Firstly, because I was poor and had to fight to provide for my basic needs. Secondly, because I was young, because youth is always rebellious. Finally, because I was black and suffered from racism.

SL: What do you remember of the attack on the Moncada barracks by Fidel Castro and his companions on July 26, 1953?

VD: My revolutionary commitment predates the emergence of Fidel Castro’s July 26 Movement. We were very attached to the figure and ideals of Antonio Guiteras, who had been the soul of the 1933 Revolution and who had been assassinated by Batista. We had a movement called Acción Guiteras and we organized a ceremony in his honor every May 8, the day of his death. Each time, we were repressed by the police and pelted with stones. In those days, my fervor was called Guiteras. We were also followers of Rafael García Bárcena, a philosophy professor opposed to Batista who had founded the Movimiento Nacional Revolucionario.

I didn’t know Fidel. I found out about him during the attack on the Moncada barracks. Fidel’s revolutionary action took place in the centenary year of the birth of José Marti, our national hero. I remember his plea “History will acquit me”, in which he denounced the situation of the country, racial discrimination, illiteracy, misery and injustice of all kinds. I was deeply moved by his undertaking, in which he risked his own life, and by his speech, which was both a plea for his revolutionary action and an indictment of the Batista dictatorship. He pledged to redress all injustices once the Revolution was victorious. I immediately identified with his line. Our generation had finally found its leader.

SL: When did you decide to join the armed struggle after Fidel Castro landed on the island in December 1956?

VD: Within the workers’ movement, there was a tendency in favor of armed struggle led by Victor Bordón Machado, who would later become Commander. I joined this group, which was more in line with my sensibility, and was appointed head of “Action and Sabotage” for the July 26 Movement, initially in 1957, in the Santa Clara area of Escambray. We had few weapons and had to obtain them from the enemy.

Later, as a student, I joined the Directorio Revolucionario and operated in the capital. There were two aspects to the Directorio’s involvement: the clandestine struggle in the cities and the armed struggle in the Sierra.

It should be remembered that most of the revolutionaries, starting with Fidel Castro, came from the university, which was the epicenter of the emancipatory process. There was a subsequent rapprochement between the July 26 Movement and the Directorio. At the end of the war, I was no longer a member of the Directorio but a member of the Revolution.

SL: When did you first meet Che Guevara?

VD: I met Che in October 1958, when he arrived in Escambray. He had come to visit us at the Directorio Headquarters to see Faure Chomón, our commander. He arrived with his legendary column of guerrillas, who were respected by all because they had crossed the whole island on foot at the cost of a titanic effort, following Fidel’s directives.

I remember that, in anticipation of Che’s arrival, we attacked two places: Fomento and Placeta. It was a Sunday in torrential rain. Our aim was to mobilize the army’s attention so that the column could arrive safely in Escambray. I was wounded at Placetas. Our contribution was modest and symbolic, but it was enough to enable Che to carry out his mission.

Che had made a great impression on me. He arrived at the camp where I was, wounded, and I remember he asked me if he could use the typewriter. It made a big impression on us, because our orders were to be at Che’s service. He was very courteous. In Santa Clara, people didn’t really know who this Argentinian was who had come to fight for our cause. We were reliving the story of Máximo Gomez, the Dominican who fought alongside us in the Second War of Independence. It was quite a symbol.

SL: When the Revolution triumphed in 1959, you were appointed prosecutor of the Revolutionary Courts. What was the aim of these institutions, which dispensed expeditious justice?

VD: The aim was to try people who had committed crimes. During the Batista dictatorship, 20,000 Cubans were murdered, often in atrocious conditions, by the tyranny’s henchmen. Our great concern was that the families and friends of these people cowardly murdered, and the relatives of the women who had been raped, should see justice done themselves. We didn’t want the people to lynch these individuals in the streets. There were only two options: either create the revolutionary courts and apply the law, or let the people take care of the criminals. We had experience of what had happened elsewhere, notably in Europe at the end of the Second World War, and we didn’t want extra-judicial executions.

One of the characteristics of our Revolution is that there were no massacres when the military regime fell. There was no revenge. Fidel was very clear on this point, asking the people to trust the courts to deliver justice.

As far as I’m concerned, after taking part in the fighting that led to the capture of Santa Clara, as leader of Squadron 31, I went to Havana to see my family. The Revolution then sought my help as prosecutor for the newly-created Revolutionary Courts. I returned to Santa Clara where, in addition to my role as prosecutor, I was a member of the High Council responsible for analyzing all decisions taken by the Revolutionary Courts, in order to avoid errors and unnecessary sentences. We were particularly attentive to the dignity of the accused. They had the right to a lawyer. They were never mistreated, and we allowed family visits. It wasn’t easy to see a little girl visit her father who had been sentenced to death. But the law had to be applied. We remembered the crimes committed by these same people.

SL: You took part in the fight against the counter-revolutionary groups that sprang up, particularly in the Escambray mountains, following the advent of the Revolution. How did the fight against these individuals unfold?

VD: As early as 1959, there were armed groups supported by the United States who were conspiring against the Revolution. It’s important to remember that the Eisenhower administration supported Batista right up to the very end, by sending him arms. In Escambray, there were armed groups attacking peasants, most of whom were in favor of the Revolution, and teachers involved in the literacy campaign. These men were preparing the ground for the coming invasion. Their aim was to create a bridgehead. The strategic plan was to organize an internal uprising during a future landing to support the invaders. You can’t separate Playa Girón, or the Bay of Pigs, from the Escambray counter-revolutionary struggle.

Fidel Castro, our Commander-in-Chief, therefore took the decision to counter-attack and liquidate these Yankee government-backed groups, which were mainly located in Escambray, but also in the Eastern Province and Pinar del Río. We carried out a major sweep and neutralized most of these groups before the invasion of April 1961. Our State Security apparatus had infiltrated these bandit groups. The struggle lasted until 1965.

SL: In April 1961, the United States and the CIA orchestrated the Bay of Pigs invasion. You personally took part in the fighting. Can you tell us about these events?

VD: Before the invasion of April 1961, there had been sabotage, acts of terrorism such as the explosion of the La Coubre boat in March 1960, which cost the lives of nearly a hundred people, and aerial bombardments from Florida, etc.

On the day of the invasion, I was driving towards Santiago de Cuba. When I arrived in Santa Clara at the headquarters of the Revolutionary Armed Forces, everyone was on a war footing and I was informed that an invasion had taken place: “The Americans have landed!” That was the rumor going around the island at the time. We later learned that they were Cuban renegades in the pay of the United States, not conventional troops. I asked where the landing had taken place and was told “Playa Girón”. I had absolutely no idea of the place. I’d never been there.

I joined the platoon and we headed for Girón. We entered through Yaguaramas. From the very first moments of the invasion, Fidel was in the front line of the fighting. It gave us moral strength. He appeared with his rifle on his shoulder, like all the fighters, and didn’t just give a speech in Havana’s Revolution Square. He was accompanied by other commanders. All the inhabitants of the area rose up against the invaders, while the United States thought that the people would turn against the revolutionary government. Several battalions that had been fighting the bandits in Escambray joined the struggle. In less than 72 hours, the mercenaries were crushed by the people in arms.

SL: You took part in Che Guevara’s guerrilla war in the Congo. How did this project come about?

VD: I had the historic opportunity to take part in guerrilla warfare alongside Che in Africa, in Congo Kinshasa. Joseph Désiré Kabila’s Mouvement de Libération had asked for our help, following the assassination of Patrice Lumumba by the United States and Belgium. He needed to train his staff and send some thirty officers to us for military training. Fidel agreed, but suggested that the Cubans go directly to the area to train the militants under real conditions, while taking part in the fighting against the Mobutu regime. It was the best thing to do for us and for them.

When we arrived in the Congo, we realized that Fidel was right. The geographical characteristics of the country were different from those of Cuba. We realized this during the preparation stage. In Cuba, for example, you could climb a tree to look into the distance and watch for enemy troop movements. In the Congo, this was impossible because of the dense vegetation. It was impossible to see into the distance. We discovered these specificities on the spot.

SL: What was the selection process like?

VD: There were 130 advisors in all. All were volunteers. Fidel, Raúl, Commandant Piñeros and Osmany Cienfuegos put me in charge of preparing the group for departure. My nom de guerre was Roberto for the Cubans. Nobody knew that Che was going to join the group, not even me. I remember that Osmany Cienfuegos came to see me with several photos of Che shaved and made-up by our specialists. He looked nothing like the Che I knew. Osmany said to me: “This is the Commander Ramón you know”. I told him I’d never seen him before in my life. All the commanders knew each other. I was a commander myself. We met regularly for various tasks.

One day, while I was in camp, I was picked up and we went to a house where there were various comrades-in-arms. I was sitting at the table when I saw Osmany approaching with the gentleman in the photo. I stood up, as my father had taught me. He always told me: “You must always stand up to greet people if they have good intentions, and to be able to defend yourself if they approach with hostile intentions”. So, I greeted Commander Ramon, who had a cigar in his mouth. Osmany insisted: “I’m telling you, you know him”. I racked my brains trying to remember who this individual was, without success. Then “Ramon” spoke up and said “Osmany, stop bothering Dreke”. It was only then that I recognized Che.

SL: How did the operations in the Congo go? Che spoke of failure.

VD: The great difficulty we faced was the lack of unity among the country’s revolutionary forces. There were many divisions between the different factions. We decided to form a first company under Tamayo’s leadership, which left for several weeks to carry out combat actions. We then formed a second column under my command. But there were too many difficulties. When we arrived, the enemy had already infiltrated the troops, and the idea was already spreading of seeking a peaceful settlement and abandoning the path of arms.

I don’t share Che’s opinion. For me, the Congo operation was not a failure. We had to adapt to the realities of the country and follow the orders of the Congolese chiefs. Che was not the guerrilla leader. He had to follow the directives of the local leaders. Che was the leader of the Cuban internationalist group. We had no decision-making power. We thought that the Congolese leaders should act as Fidel and Raul had done, with rifle on shoulder, in combat with the troops. In our military doctrine, in our combat philosophy, the leader is always with his troops, on the front line, facing danger and setting an example. But this was not the case in the Congo. Kabila had a different vision of things. Fidel had insisted that we follow the directives of the Congolese and never impose our point of view. We expressed our opinion and let the country’s leaders make the decisions.

Far from being a failure, the Congo operation helped other peoples in struggle to understand how to wage war against colonialism, and what mistakes not to make, whether in Angola or Guinea-Bissau. Our attitude was exemplary, and six of our comrades fell fighting in the Congo. It was an example that will go down in history, particularly in African history. Che is part of African history.

The Congo venture was not a failure. We were able to convince our African brothers that we could conquer freedom through arms.

SL: What does the figure of Che mean to you and to the Cuban people?

VD: Che was a noble soul. We often talk about the guerrilla, but first and foremost he was a noble soul. He was a man of great generosity. You don’t give up what’s dearest to you – your family, your country, your friends, your well-being – if you’re not made of greatness. He was a just man, energetic, firm, an example, who never mistreated anyone, least of all prisoners.

The Cuban people venerate Che even more than when he was alive. Even young people, who never knew him, have great respect for his figure. When you mention his name, you have to discover yourself, in memory of his history and his sacrifice for the cause of the humble.

SL: After the Congo, you headed the military mission to Guinea Bissau and Cape Verde, where Amilcar Cabral led the armed struggle against Portuguese colonialism. Tell us about that experience.

VD: After the Congo, we lent our support to the national liberation struggle of the people of Guinea Bissau. Sékou Touré, the first President of Guinea, played an important role in the decolonization of Africa. He gave us great support during our missions on the continent. We trained the militia in Conakry to prevent a coup d’état against Touré by the Portuguese. Touré was courageous and supportive of Amilcar Cabral.

In Guinea Bissau, the situation was different from that in Congo. After the 1966 Tricontinental Conference in Havana, Amilcar Cabral asked for our help and technical support. He didn’t want the Cubans to take part in the fighting.

Amilcar Cabral was one of the most clear-sighted revolutionary leaders of his time, as demonstrated at the Tricontinental Conference, where he spoke out in favor of armed struggle. He had a solid intellectual training. Jorge Risquet, our man in Africa, had met him in Congo Brazzaville and was impressed by his vision. Risquet offered him men, but Amilcar refused, stressing that he only needed trainers and advisers, as it was up to the Guineans themselves to liberate their own country. “We must make our own revolution”, he said. He wanted to prepare the country’s future by training his people to assume the responsibilities of independence. Amilcar had achieved the feat of uniting his people under the flag of independence, no easy feat, in both Guinea Bissau and Cape Verde, two distinct and non-bordering territories almost 1,000 kilometers apart. His father was Cape Verdean and his mother Guinean. Unfortunately, Amilcar Cabral was assassinated by traitors in the pay of Lisbon, a few months before his homeland gained independence.

SL: What motivates an internationalist to carry out a mission far from his native land, with all the sacrifices that entails?

VD: First and foremost, it’s a call from the heart. When we see the misery, oppression and poverty that strike the most vulnerable, we can’t remain insensitive. Deep down, we feel a moral imperative to act to help these peoples in their struggle for dignity. That’s why, in addition to my military missions, I ran an internationalist school in Cuba. Later, I led construction projects in Africa, in Guinea Bissau, Cape Verde, Mozambique and Angola.

It must be stressed that we have always intervened at the request of the people. We have never imposed our presence on anyone. We went to the Congo at the request of Kabila’s revolutionaries and left the country when they considered that our mission had come to an end. It’s important to remember this. Che did not leave the Congo of his own accord. He didn’t abandon the National Liberation Movement. We left because Kabila asked us to leave the country.

SL: Did you visit Algeria during this period?

VD: I went to Algiers in 1967 and even met President Houari Boumediene. It was our first visit since 1965 and Ben Bella’s departure from power. I remember that Boumediene asked me to convey a message of solidarity to Fidel. We’ve always had great relations with Algeria, especially with Ben Bella. We have great respect for the Algerians. Unity between Cuba and Algeria has been very strong. We can’t forget the ties, particularly during the early years of the Cuban Revolution and the first years of Algerian independence. The 1960s were revolutionary and glorious.

SL: What did you do when you returned to Cuba, and what is your position today?

VD: I joined the Armed Forces in various units. I was head of construction. I founded the Juvenile Labor Army in the eastern region, which was in charge of agricultural production, particularly for crops such as sugar cane and coffee. I was also Head of the Central Political Directorate of the Armed Forces.

Today, I’m President of the Cuba-Africa Friendship Association. For us Cubans, Africa is the symbol of the resistance of a people, a continent, that has been mistreated, bullied and resisted. Today, the peoples of Africa are saying “no” to the powerful, which wasn’t obvious back then, with the exception of a few leaders like Sékou Touré or Ahmed Ben Bella. Our people are descended from enslaved Africans, torn from their homeland to be exploited in America. Our culture is African. How many Africans have died in Cuba? You can’t separate Cuba from Africa. For us Cubans, Africa is our heart, our blood.

SL: Last question: what does Fidel Castro mean to Cubans?

VD: I’ve had two fathers in my life: Dreke Castillo and Fidel Castro. That’s what Fidel means to me. He taught me to have a line of conduct, honor and principles. He taught me that you always have to get up after you’ve fallen. That’s why we’ve been resisting the criminal economic blockade imposed on us by the United States for decades. Fidel taught us to stand our ground when the going gets tough, and to never give up under any circumstances. For this, we can count on the support of the peoples of Africa and beyond.

###

“Para Nosotros Los Cubanos, África Es Nuestro Corazón, Nuestra Sangre”

La Lucha puede hacernos hermosos, por eso la Revolución Cubana siempre inspirará. Es como si nosotros empezamos a ver la columna vertebral de nosotros mismos, el espíritu que nos hace permanecer firmes.~aw
Victor Dreke
 
Artículo compartido Por Víctor Dreke, Salim Lamrani | 4 de junio de 2024
Fuente: Publicado originalmente por Z. No dudes en compartirlo ampliamente.

Cuba Para nosotros los cubanos, África es nuestro corazón, nuestra sangreImagen de Tumpatumcla~commonswiki, Creative Comunes 4.0

Nacido en el seno de una familia modesta en Sagua la Grande en 1937, Víctor Dreke vivió de primera mano las realidades de la Cuba prerrevolucionaria, marcada por la pobreza, el racismo y la discriminación de todo tipo. Él frecuentaba los círculos obreros, en particular la industria azucarera, muy presente en su país natal región, e identificados con sus demandas de justicia social. Al mismo tiempo, se convirtió en el líder de su escuela, representante estudiantil, expresando las preocupaciones de su generación.

El 10 de marzo de 1952, apenas había cumplido quince años, cuando el general Fulgencio Batista orquestó un golpe de estado que destrozó el orden constitucional e instaló una dictadura militar que duraría seis largos años. Descubrió la figura de Fidel Castro tras el ataque al cuartel Moncada en Santiago de Cuba el 26 de julio de 1953, e inmediatamente identificado con su causa, defendida en su declaración/requisitoria conocida como “La historia me absolverá”.

Con el estallido de la lucha armada en la Sierra Maestra el 2 de diciembre de 1956, tras el desembarco de revolucionarios en la isla, Víctor Dreke también pasó a la clandestinidad en la región central del país. Allí conoció al Che Guevara y participó en la batalla final de Santa Clara en diciembre 1958.

Con el advenimiento de la Revolución Cubana el 1 de enero de 1959, Víctor Dreke fue nombrado fiscal de los Tribunales Revolucionarios encargados de juzgar los crímenes de sangre cometidos por el anterior régimen. También participó en la lucha contra los grupos armados contrarrevolucionarios en la Sierra del Escambray, y se enfrentó a la invasión de Bahía de Cochinos organizada por Estados Unidos.

En 1965, altos funcionarios del gobierno le pidieron que organizara un grupo de combatientes voluntarios para ayudar a los guerrilleros en el Congo, en compañía del Che Guevara. También lideró varias misiones internacionalistas en Guinea Bissau y Cabo Verde a solicitud de Amílcar Cabral, que en ese momento estaba llevando a cabo una guerra de liberación nacional contra el colonialismo portugués. Hoy, como Presidente de la Asociación de Amistrad Cuba-África Asociación de Amistad, Víctor Dreke hace un repaso de su historia y analiza los vínculos entre la isla caribeña y la cuna de la humanidad.


Salim Lamrani: ¿Qué recuerdos tiene de su infancia y juventud?

Víctor Dreke: Nací el 10 de marzo de 1937 en un pueblo llamado Sagua la Grande, en la antigua provincia de Las Villas, hoy llamada Villa Clara. Era una zona próspera en ese momento. Soy el más joven de una familia mestiza. Mi familia se llamaba Castillo Dreke, que era el nombre de mi padre. Mi madre Catalina Mora venía de un pueblo llamado Sierra Morena, cerca de Sagua la Grande. Podría haberme llamado Castillo, como uno de mis hermanos, pero mi padre decidió darme el apellido de Dreke.

Debo decir que fui un niño afortunado en medio de la miseria que afligía al país en ese momento. Mi madre Catalina, que me dio a luz, y mi madre adoptiva Felicia, que me crió, cuidó mucho de mí. Mi familia era pobre y vivíamos en una casita con techo de guano en la calle Agramonte nº 30 de Sagua la Grande. No era un chico malo y debo decir que era muy educado. También recuerdo que cuando visitaba a mis amigos a la hora del almuerzo y me preguntaban si había comido, me habíanenseñado a responder siempre lo mismo, que ya había comido y no tenía hambre, aunque no fuera cierto. Esa fue nuestra educación.

Como todos los niños de mi edad, cometí algunos errores, pero no fui travieso. Mi nombre completo es Víctor Emilio y mis amigos de la infancia me llamaban “Emilito”. Si me comparo con los niños de hoy, yo era un niño sin mucha instrucción. Fui a un colegio privado que tenía que ser pagado, dirigido por monjas, y recuerdo que teníamos que rezar los viernes. Sin embargo, por razones familiares, no me bauticé hasta que fui un adulto. No era un mal estudiante, pero no era brillante.

 

SL: ¿Recuerdas el golpe de Estado de Fulgencio Batista el 10 de marzo de 1952?

VD: Lo recuerdo perfectamente, porque era mi cumpleaños, mi cumpleaños número 15. Con un grupo de jóvenes, salimos a las calles a manifestarnos contra el golpe. Fuimos arrestados por la policía, que nos llevó a la estación antes de liberarnos. Puedo decir que mi compromiso como aspirante a revolucionario comenzó precisamente en esa fecha.

Mi padre hacía todo lo posible para explicarme la situación en la que se encontraba el país. Él era simpatizante del Partido Auténtico de Ramón Grau San Martín y Carlos Prío Socarrás, sin ser muy político. Anteriormente había estado vinculado al Partido Liberal. Era vendedor de pescado y pensaba que todos los políticos eran iguales, prolijos a la hora de hacer promesas electorales, pero menos inspirados a la hora de adoptar medidas para el bien común.

Mi hermano mayor, Mario, fue militante del Partido Ortodoxo de Eduardo Chibás. En cuanto a mí, no pertenecía a ningún partido. Yo no era marxista. De hecho, en ese momento, no había escuchado nada más que cosas negativas sobre el comunismo. Participé en huelgas obreras en la industria azucarera. Había muchos ingenios azucareros de la provincia. También fui representante estudiantil en la Escuela Secundaria de Varones José Martí en Sagua la Grande. Entonces, me politicé de esta manera, militando con los trabajadores y los estudiantes.

Me oponía resueltamente a la dictadura, que asesinaba a los opositores y hundía al pueblo en una miseria indecible. Recuerdo que la policía nos decía que los negros no podían ser revolucionarios. Yo temblaba de indignación.

 

SL: ¿Cómo se manifestó el racismo en Cuba bajo el régimen militar de Batista?

VR: Fuimos discriminados por el color de nuestra piel. Teníamos menos derechos. Lo mismo se aplicaba a las mujeres en relación con los hombres: sufrieron la opresión de una sociedad patriarcal.

Me convertí en revolucionario por tres razones fundamentales. En primer lugar, porque era pobre y tenía que luchar para satisfacer mis necesidades básicas. En segundo lugar, porque yo era joven, porque la juventud siempre es rebelde. Finalmente, porque era negro y sufría de racismo.

 

SL: ¿Qué recuerda del ataque al cuartel Moncada por parte de Fidel Castro y sus compañeros el 26 de julio de 1953?

VD: Mi compromiso revolucionario es anterior al surgimiento del Movimiento 26 de Julio de Fidel Castro. Nosotros estabamos muy apegados a la figura y los ideales de Antonio Guiteras que había sido el alma de la Revolución de 1933 y que había sido asesinado por Batista. Teníamos un movimiento que se llamaba Acción Guiteras y organizábamos una ceremonia en su honor cada 8 de mayo, día de su muerte. Cada vez, éramos reprimidos por la policía y apedreados. En aquellos días, mi fervor se llamaba Guiteras. Nosotros también éramos seguidores de Rafael García Bárcena, un profesor de filosofía opuesto a Batista que había fundado el Movimiento Nacional Revolucionario.

Yo no conocía a Fidel. Supe de él durante el ataque al cuartel Moncada. La acción revolucionaria de Fidel tuvo lugar en el año del centenario del nacimiento de José Martí, nuestro héroe nacional. Yo recuerdo su alegato “La historia me absolverá”, en el que denunció la situación del país, la discriminación racial, el analfabetismo, la miseria y la injusticia de todo tipo. Me conmovió profundamente su acción, en la que arriesgó su propia vida, y su discurso, que era a la vez una exposición de su acción revolucionaria y una acusación a la dictadura de Batista. Se comprometió a eliminar todas las injusticias una vez que triunfara la Revolución. Inmediatamente me identifiqué con su postura. Nuestra generación por fin había encontrado a su líder.

 

SL: ¿Cuándo decidiste unirte a la lucha armada después de que Fidel Castro desembarcara en la isla en diciembre de 1956?

VD: Dentro del movimiento obrero había una tendencia a favor de la lucha armada liderada por Víctor Bordón Machado, quien más tarde llegaría a ser Comandante. Me uní a este grupo, que estaba más en línea con mi sensibilidad, y fui nombrado jefe de “Acción y Sabotaje” del Movimiento 26 de Julio, inicialmente en 1957, en la zona de Santa Clara del Escambray. Teníamos pocas armas y tuvimos que conseguirlas del enemigo.

Más tarde, como estudiante, me incorporé al Directorio Revolucionario y operé en la capital. Había dos aspectos de la participación del Directorio: la lucha clandestina en las ciudades y la lucha armada lucha en la Sierra.

Hay que recordar que la mayoría de los revolucionarios, empezando por Fidel Castro, procedían de la universidad, que fue el epicentro del proceso emancipatorio. Hubo una subsecuente acercamiento entre el Movimiento 26 de Julio y el Directorio. Al final de la guerra, yo no era ya era miembro del Directorio y miembro de la Revolución.

 

SL: ¿Cuándo conociste al Che Guevara?

VD: Conocí al Che en octubre de 1958, cuando llegó al Escambray. Había venido a visitarnos al  Cuartel General del Directorio para ver a Faure Chomón, nuestro comandante. Llegó con su legendaria columna de guerrilleros, que eran respetados por todos porque habían atravesado toda la isla a pie a costa de un esfuerzo titánico, siguiendo las órdenes de Fidel.

Recuerdo que, anticipándonos a la llegada del Che, atacamos dos lugares: Fomento y Placeta. Era un domingo bajo una lluvia torrencial. Nuestro objetivo era distraer la atención del ejército para que la columna pudiera llegar sana y salva al Escambray. Fui herido en Placetas. Nuestra contribución fue modesta y simbólica, pero fue suficiente para que el Che pudiera llevar a cabo su misión.

El Che me había causado una gran impresión. Llegó al campamento donde yo estaba, herido, y recuerdo que me preguntó si podía usar la máquina de escribir. Nos causó una gran impresión, porque teníamos órdenes de ponernos al servicio del Che. Fue muy cortés. En Santa Clara, la gente no sabía realmente quién era este argentino que había venido a luchar por nuestra causa. Estábamos reviviendo la historia de Máximo Gómez, el dominicano que luchó junto a los cubanos en la Segunda Guerra de Independencia. Era todo un símbolo.

 

SL: Cuando triunfó la Revolución en 1959, usted fue nombrado fiscal de los Tribunales Revolucionarios. ¿Cuál era el objetivo de estas instituciones, que impartían justicia expedita?

VD: El objetivo era juzgar a personas que habían cometido delitos. Durante la dictadura de Batista, 20.000 cubanos fueron asesinados, a menudo en condiciones atroces, por los secuaces de la tiranía. Nuestra gran preocupación era que las familias y amigos de estas personas cobardemente asesinadas, y los parientes de las mujeres que habían sido violadas, vieran que se hacía justicia por sí mismos. No queríamos que la gente linchara a estos individuos en las calles. Sólo había dos opciones: o crear los tribunales revolucionarios y aplicar la ley, o dejar que el pueblo se hiciera cargo de los criminales. Teníamos experiencia de lo que había sucedido en otros lugares, especialmente en Europa al final de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y no queríamos ejecuciones extrajudiciales.

Una de las características de nuestra Revolución es que no hubo masacres cuando cayó el régimen militar. No hubo venganza. Fidel fue muy claro en este punto, pidiendo al pueblo que confíe en los tribunales para hacer justicia. En lo que a mí respecta, después de participar en los combates que condujeron a la toma de Santa Clara, como jefe del Escuadrón 31, fui a La Habana a ver a mi familia. La Revolución buscó entonces mi ayuda como fiscal de los recién creados Tribunales Revolucionarios. Regresé a Santa Clara donde, además de mi papel de fiscal, fui miembro del Consejo Superior encargado de analizar todas las decisiones tomadas por los Tribunales Revolucionarios, con el fin de evitar errores y sentencias innecesarias. Estuvimos especialmente atentos a la dignidad de los acusados. Tenían derecho a un abogado. Nunca fueron maltratados y permitimos visitas familiares. No era fácil ver a una niña visitar a su padre, que había sido condenado a muerte. Pero tenía que aplicarse la ley. Recordábamos loe crímenes cometios por esa misma gente. 

 

SL: Usted participó en la lucha contra los grupos contrarrevolucionarios que surgieron, sobre todo en el Escambray, a raíz del advenimiento de la Revolución. ¿Cómo se desarrolló la lucha contra estos individuos?

VD: Ya en 1959 había grupos armados apoyados por Estados Unidos que conspiraban contra la Revolución. Es importante recordar que el gobierno de Eisenhower apoyó a Batista hasta el final, enviándole armas. En el Escambray había grupos armados que atacaban a los campesinos, la mayoría de los cuales estaban a favor de la Revolución, y a los maestros que participaban en la campaña de alfabetización. Estos hombres estaban preparando el terreno para la invasión que se avecinaba. Su objetivo era crear una cabeza de puente. El plan estratégico era organizar un levantamiento interno durante un futuro desembarco para apoyar a los invasores. No se puede separar Playa Girón, o Bahía de Cochinos, de la lucha contrarrevolucionaria del Escambray. Por lo tanto, Fidel Castro, nuestro Comandante en Jefe, tomó la decisión de contraatacar y liquízar a estos grupos respaldados por el gobierno yanqui, que se encontraban principalmente en el Escambray, pero también en la Provincia Oriental y Pinar del Río. Llevamos a cabo una gran redada y neutralizamos a la mayoría de estos grupos antes de la invasión de abril de 1961. Nuestro aparato de Seguridad del Estado se había infiltrado en estos grupos de bandidos. La lucha duró hasta 1965.

 

SL: En abril de 1961, Estados Unidos y la CIA orquestaron la invasión de Bahía de Cochinos. Usted participó personalmente en los combates. ¿Puede hablarnos de estos acontecimientos?

VD: Antes de la invasión de abril de 1961 se habían producido sabotajes, actos de terrorismo como la explosión del barco La Coubre en marzo de 1960, que costó la vida a casi un centenar de personas, y bombardeos aéreos desde Florida, etc.
El día de la invasión, yo conducía hacia Santiago de Cuba. Cuando llegué a Santa Clara, al cuartel general de las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias, todos estaban en pie de guerra y me informaron que se había producido una invasión: “¡Los norteamericanos han desembarcado!”. Ese era el rumor que circulaba por la isla en ese momento. Más tarde supimos que eran renegados cubanos a sueldo de Estados Unidos, no tropas convencionales. Pregunté dónde había tenido lugar el desembarco y me dijeron “Playa Girón”. No tenía ni idea del lugar. Nunca había estado allí. Me uní al pelotón y nos dirigimos a Girón. Entramos por Yaguaramas. Desde los primeros momentos de la invasión, Fidel estuvo en la primera línea de combate. Nos dio fuerza moral. Apareció con su fusil al hombro, como todos los combatientes, y no solo dio un discurso en la Plaza de la Revolución de La Habana. Lo acompañaban otros comandantes. Todos los habitantes de la zona se levantaron contra los invasores, mientras que los Unite

 

SL: Usted participó en la guerra de guerrillas del Che Guevara en el Congo. ¿Cómo surgió este proyecto?

VD: Ya en 1959 había grupos armados apoyados por Estados Unidos que conspiraban contra la Revolución. Es importante recordar que el gobierno de Eisenhower apoyó a Batista hasta el final, enviándole armas. En el Escambray había grupos armados que atacaban a los campesinos, la mayoría de los cuales estaban a favor de la Revolución, y a los maestros que participaban en la campaña de alfabetización. Estos hombres estaban preparando el terreno para la invasión que se avecinaba. Su objetivo era crear una cabeza de puente. El plan estratégico era organizar un levantamiento interno durante un futuro desembarco para apoyar a los invasores. No se puede separar Playa Girón, o Bahía de Cochinos, de la lucha contrarrevolucionaria del Escambray. Por lo tanto, Fidel Castro, nuestro Comandante en Jefe, tomó la decisión de contraatacar y liquízar a estos grupos respaldados por el gobierno yanqui, que se encontraban principalmente en el Escambray, pero también en la Provincia Oriental y Pinar del Río. Llevamos a cabo una gran redada y neutralizamos a la mayoría de estos grupos antes de la invasión de abril de 1961. Nuestro aparato de Seguridad del Estado se había infiltrado en estos grupos de bandidos. La lucha duró hasta 1965.

 

SL: En abril de 1961, Estados Unidos y la CIA orquestaron la invasión de Bahía de Cochinos. Usted participó personalmente en los combates. ¿Puede hablarnos de estos acontecimientos?

VD: Antes de la invasión de abril de 1961 se habían producido sabotajes, actos de terrorismo como la explosión del barco La Coubre en marzo de 1960, que costó la vida a casi un centenar de personas, y bombardeos aéreos desde Florida, etc.
El día de la invasión, yo conducía hacia Santiago de Cuba. Cuando llegué a Santa Clara, al cuartel general de las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias, todos estaban en pie de guerra y me informaron que se había producido una invasión: “¡Los norteamericanos han desembarcado!”. Ese era el rumor que circulaba por la isla en ese momento. Más tarde supimos que eran renegados cubanos a sueldo de Estados Unidos, no tropas convencionales. Pregunté dónde había tenido lugar el desembarco y me dijeron “Playa Girón”. No tenía ni idea del lugar. Nunca había estado allí. Me uní al pelotón y nos dirigimos a Girón. Entramos por Yaguaramas. Desde los primeros momentos de la invasión, Fidel estuvo en la primera línea de combate. Nos dio fuerza moral. Apareció con su fusil al hombro, como todos los combatientes, y no solo dio un discurso en la Plaza de la Revolución de La Habana. Lo acompañaban otros comandantes. Todos los habitantes de la zona se levantaron contra los invasores, mientras que los Unite

 

SL: Usted participó en la guerra de guerrillas del Che Guevara en el Congo. ¿Cómo surgió este proyecto?

VD: Tuve la oportunidad histórica de participar en la guerra de guerrillas junto al Che en África, en el Congo de Kinshasa. El Movimiento de Liberación de Joseph Désiré Kabila había pedido nuestra ayuda, tras el asesinato de Patrice Lumumba por los Estados Unidos y Bélgica. Necesitaba entrenar a su personal y enviarnos una treintena de oficiales para que recibieran entrenamiento militar. Fidel estuvo de acuerdo, pero sugirió que los cubanos fueran directamente a la zona para entrenar a los militantes en condiciones reales, mientras participaban en la lucha contra el régimen de Mobutu. Era lo mejor que podíamos hacer para nosotros y para ellos.

Cuando llegamos al Congo, nos dimos cuenta de que Fidel tenía razón. Las características geográficas del país eran diferentes a las de Cuba. Nos dimos cuenta de esto durante la etapa de preparación. En Cuba, por ejemplo, podías subirte a un árbol para mirar a lo lejos y observar los movimientos de las tropas enemigas. En el Congo, esto era imposible debido a la densa vegetación. Era imposible ver a lo lejos. Descubrimos estas especificidades sobre el terreno.

 

SL: ¿Cómo fue el proceso de selección?

VD: Había 130 asesores en total. Todos eran voluntarios. Fidel, Raúl, el Comandante Piñeros y
Osmany Cienfuegos me encargó de preparar al grupo para la partida. Mi nombre de guerra era Roberto para los cubanos. Nadie sabía que el Che iba a entrar en el grupo, ni siquiera yo. Recuerdo que Osmany Cienfuegos vino a verme con varias fotos del Che afeitado y maquillado por nuestros especialistas. No se parecía en nada al Che que yo conocía. Osmany me dijo: “Este es el comandante Ramón que conoces”. Le dije que nunca lo había visto en mi vida. Todos los comandantes se conocían entre sí. Yo mismo era comandante. Nos reuníamos regularmente para diversas tareas. Un día, mientras estaba en el campamento, me recogieron y fuimos a una casa donde había varios compañeros de armas. Yo estaba sentado a la mesa cuando vi que Osmany se acercaba con el señor de la foto. Me puse de pie, como me había enseñado mi padre. Siempre me decía: “Siempre hay que ponerse de pie para saludar a las personas si tienen buenas intenciones, y para poder defenderse si se acercan con intenciones hostiles”. Así que saludé al comandante Ramón, que tenía un cigarro en la boca. Osmany insistió: “Te lo digo, tú lo conoces”. Me devané los sesos tratando de recordar quién era este individuo, sin éxito. Entonces “Ramón” tomó la palabra y dijo: “Osmany, deja de molestar a Dreke”. Fue entonces cuando reconocí al Che.

 

SL: ¿Cómo fueron las operaciones en el Congo? El Che hablaba de fracaso.

VD: La gran dificultad que enfrentamos fue la falta de unidad entre las fuerzas revolucionarias del país. Hubo muchas divisiones entre las diferentes facciones. Decidimos formar una primera compañía bajo el mando de Tamayo, que partió por varias semanas para realizar acciones de combate. Luego formamos una segunda columna bajo mi mando. Pero había demasiadas dificultades. Cuando llegamos, el enemigo ya se había infiltrado en las tropas, y ya se estaba extendiendo la idea de buscar una solución pacífica y abandonar el camino de las armas. 

No comparto la opinión del Che. Para mí, la operación en el Congo no fue un fracaso. Tuvimos que adaptarnos a las realidades del país y seguir las órdenes de los jefes congoleños. El Che no era el líder guerrillero. Tenía que seguir las directrices de los líderes locales. El Che era el líder del grupo internacionalista cubano. No teníamos poder de decisión. Pensábamos que los dirigentes congoleños debían actuar como lo habían hecho Fidel y Raúl, con fusil al hombro, en combate con las tropas. En nuestra doctrina militar, en nuestra filosofía de combate, el líder está siempre con sus tropas, en primera línea, enfrentando el peligro y dando ejemplo. Pero este no fue el caso en el Congo. Kabila tenía una visión diferente de las cosas. Fidel había insistido en que siguiéramos las directrices de los congoleños y nunca impusiéramos nuestro punto de vista. Expresamos nuestra opinión y dejamos que los líderes del país tomaran las decisiones.
Lejos de ser un fracaso, la operación del Congo ayudó a otros pueblos en lucha a comprender cómo hacer la guerra contra el colonialismo y qué errores no cometer, ya sea en Angola o en Guinea-Bissau. Nuestra actitud fue ejemplar, y seis de nuestros camaradas cayeron luchando en el Congo. Fue un ejemplo que pasará a la historia, sobre todo a la historia africana. El Che es parte de la historia africana. La aventura en el Congo no fue un fracaso. Fuimos capaces de convencer a nuestros hermanos africanos de que podíamos conquistar la libertad por las armas.

 

SL: ¿Qué significa la figura del Che para usted y para el pueblo cubano?

VD: El Che era un alma noble. A menudo hablamos del guerrillero, pero ante todo era un alma noble. Era un hombre de gran generosidad. No renuncias a lo que más te gusta -tu familia, tu país, tus amigos, tu bienestar- si no estás hecho de grandeza. Era un hombre justo, enérgico, firme, un ejemplo, que nunca maltrataba a nadie, y menos a los presos.
El pueblo cubano venera al Che aún más que cuando estaba vivo. Incluso los jóvenes, que nunca lo conocieron, tienen un gran respeto por su figura. Cuando mencionas su nombre, tienes que descubrirte a ti mismo, en memoria de su historia y de su sacrificio por la causa de los humildes.

 

SL: Después del Congo, usted encabezó la misión militar a Guinea Bissau y Cabo Verde, donde Amílcar Cabral dirigió la lucha armada contra el colonialismo portugués. Cuéntanos sobre esa experiencia.

VD: Después del Congo, apoyamos la lucha de liberación nacional del pueblo de Guinea Bissau. Sékou Touré, el primer Presidente de Guinea, desempeñó un papel importante en la descolonización de África. Nos dio un gran apoyo durante nuestras misiones en el continente. Entrenamos a la milicia en Conakry para evitar un golpe de Estado contra Touré por parte de los portugueses. Touré fue valiente y apoyó a Amílcar Cabral.

En Guinea Bissau, la situación es diferente a la del Congo. Después de la Conferencia Tricontinental de 1966 en La Habana, Amílcar Cabral solicitó nuestra ayuda y apoyo técnico. No quería que los cubanos participaran en los combates.
Amílcar Cabral fue uno de los líderes revolucionarios más lúcidos de su tiempo, como quedó demostrado en la Conferencia Tricontinental, donde se pronunció a favor de la lucha armada. Tenía una sólida formación intelectual. Jorge Risquet, nuestro hombre en África, lo había conocido en Congo Brazzaville y quedó impresionado por su visión. Risquet le ofreció hombres, pero Amílcar se negó, subrayando que sólo necesitaba entrenadores y consejeros, ya que dependía de los propios guineanos liberar su propio país. “Debemos hacer nuestra propia revolución”, dijo. Quería preparar el futuro del país capacitando a su pueblo para que asumiera las responsabilidades de la independencia. Amílcar había logrado la hazaña de unir a su pueblo bajo la bandera de la independencia, una hazaña nada fácil, tanto en Guinea Bissau como en Cabo Verde, dos territorios distintos y no limítrofes a casi 1.000 kilómetros de distancia. Su padre era caboverdiano y su madre guineana. Desgraciadamente, Amílcar Cabral fue asesinado por traidores a sueldo de Lisboa, pocos meses antes de que su patria se independizara.

 

SL: ¿Qué motiva a un internacionalista a llevar a cabo una misión lejos de su tierra natal, con todos los sacrificios que eso conlleva?

VD: En primer lugar, es una llamada del corazón. Cuando vemos la miseria, la opresión y la pobreza que golpean a los más vulnerables, no podemos permanecer insensibles. En el fondo, sentimos el imperativo moral de actuar para ayudar a estos pueblos en su lucha por la dignidad. Por eso, además de mis misiones militares, dirigí una escuela internacionalista en Cuba. Más tarde, dirigí proyectos constructivos en Africa, en Guinea Bissau, Cabo Verde, Mozambique y Angola.
Hay que subrayar que siempre hemos intervenido a petición del pueblo. Nunca hemos impuesto nuestra presencia a nadie. Fuimos al Congo a petición de los revolucionarios de Kabila y abandonamos el país cuando consideraron que nuestra misión había llegado a su fin. Es importante recordar esto. El Che no abandonó el Congo por su propia voluntad. No abandonó el Movimiento de Liberación Nacional. Nos fuimos porque Kabila nos pidió que nos fuéramos del país.

 

SL: ¿Visitó Argelia durante este período?

VD: Fui a Argel en 1967 e incluso conocí al presidente Houari Boumediene. Fue nuestra primera visita desde 1965 y la salida de Ben Bella del poder. Recuerdo que Boumediene me pidió que le transmitiera un mensaje de solidaridad a Fidel. Siempre hemos tenido una gran relación con Argelia, especialmente con Ben Bella. Tenemos un gran respeto por los argelinos. La unidad entre Cuba y Argelia ha sido muy fuerte. No podemos olvidar los vínculos, sobre todo durante los primeros años de la Revolución Cubana y los primeros años de la independencia argelina. La década de 1960 fue revolucionaria y gloriosa.

 

SL: ¿Qué hizo cuando regresó a Cuba y cuál es su posición hoy?

VD: Ingresé a las Fuerzas Armadas en varias unidades. Yo era jefe de construcción. Fundé el Ejército de Trabajo Juvenil en la región oriental, que se encargaba de la producción agrícola, particularmente de cultivos como la caña de azúcar y el café. También fui Jefe de la Dirección Política Central de las Fuerzas Armadas.

Hoy soy presidente de la Asociación de Amistad Cuba-África. Para nosotros, los cubanos, África es el símbolo de la resistencia de un pueblo, de un continente, que ha sido maltratado, intimidado y resistido. Hoy, los pueblos de África están diciendo “no” a los poderosos, lo que no era obvio en ese entonces, con la excepción de algunos líderes como Sékou Touré o Ahmed Ben Bella. Nuestro pueblo es descendiente de africanos esclavizados, arrancados de su tierra natal para ser explotados en América. Nuestra cultura es africana. ¿Cuántos africanos han muerto en Cuba? No se puede separar a Cuba de África. Para nosotros, los cubanos, África es nuestro corazón, nuestra sangre.

 

SL: Una última pregunta: ¿qué significa Fidel Castro para los cubanos?

VD: He tenido dos padres en mi vida: Dreke Castillo y Fidel Castro. Eso es lo que Fidel significa para mí. Me enseñó a tener una línea de conducta, honor y principios. Me enseñó que siempre hay que levantarse después de haberse caído. Por eso llevamos décadas resistiendo el criminal bloqueo económico que nos impone Estados Unidos. Fidel nos enseñó a mantenernos firmes cuando las cosas se ponen difíciles, y a nunca rendirnos bajo ninguna circunstancia. Para ello, podemos contar con el apoyo de los pueblos de África y de otros países.
 

###